"not to say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent but he was at heart a born adventurer though by a trick of fate he had consistently remained a landlubber except you call going to Holyhead which was his longest.
Martin Cunningham frequently said he would work a pass through Egan but some deuced hitch or other eternally cropped up with the net result that the scheme fell through. But even suppose it did come to planking down the needful and breaking Boyd's heart" (U16.501)
"it was not so dear, purse permitting, a few guineas at the outside considering the fare to Mullingar where he figured on going was five and six, there and back. The trip would benefit health on account of the bracing ozone and be in every way thoroughly pleasurable, especially for a chap whose liver was out of order, seeing the different places along the route, Plymouth, Falmouth, Southampton and so on" (U16.507)
"culminating in an instructive tour of the sights of the great metropolis, the spectacle of our modern Babylon where doubtless he would see the greatest improvement, tower, abbey, wealth of Park lane to renew acquaintance with. Another thing just struck him as a by no means bad notion was he might have a gaze around on the spot to see about trying to make arrangements about a concert tour of summer music embracing the most prominent pleasure resorts," (U16.513)
"Margate with mixed bathing and firstrate hydros and spas," (U16.519)
"Eastbourne," (U16.520)
"Scarborough, Margate and so on, beautiful Bournemouth, the Channel islands and similar bijou spots, which might prove highly remunerative. Not, of course, with a hole and corner scratch company or local ladies on the job, witness Mrs C P M'Coy type lend me your valise and I'll post you the ticket." (U16.520)
"No, something top notch, an all star Irish cast, the Tweedy-Flower grand opera company with his own legal consort as leading lady as a sort of counterblast to the Elster Grimes and Moody-Manners, perfectly simple matter and he was quite sanguine of success, providing puffs in the local papers could be managed by some fellow with a bit of bounce who could pull the indispensable wires and thus combine business with pleasure. But who? That was the rub." (U16.524)

Fanny Moody (1866 - 1945) was a soprano opera singer, born in Redruth, Cornwall in a musical family (her sisters Lily and Hilda Moody were also opera singers). She made her debut as Arline in 'The Bohemian Girl' with the Carl Rosa Opera Co (1887) and stayed with the company until 1890; she then sang under Augustus Harris at Covent Garden and Drury Lane (1890-94). Her roles included Eileen in 'The Lily of Killarney', Micaela in 'Carmen", Marguerite in 'Faust', as well as leading roles in 'La Juive', 'I Puritani' and several Wagner operas.
Charles Manners (1857 - 1935) was a bass opera singer. His real name was Southcote Mansergh. He was born in London, son of Colonel Mansergh, an Irishman. He studied music with Dr. O'Donogue in Dublin, the Royal Academy of Music in London, and in Italy. He sang with the D'Oyly Carte organization in 1882, advancing from a member of the chorus, to creating the part of Private Willis in 'Iolanthe' at the Savoy. In 1883, he left the D'Oyly Carte and the Savoy. He was principal bass with the Carl Rosa Opera Company for two years, then spent four years at Covent Garden. His Covent Garden debut was as Bertramo in 'Roberto il Diavolo' (1890), opposite Fanny Moody.

Moody and Manners married in 1890. The couple appeared together in the London premiere of Tchaikovsky's 'Eugene Onegin' (Olympic Theatre, 1892). They formed a concert party that later became the Moody-Manners Opera Company (1894), thereafter split into A and B. They toured Canada and South Africa (1896-97) and extensively in the British provinces and Ireland. Manners performed in the Company and served as its managing director. The Moody-Manners A Company was for some time the largest opera company ever to tour in Great Britain. The Moody-Manners Companies were disbanded before World War I.
"providing puffs in the local papers could be managed by some fellow with a bit of bounce who could pull the indispensable wires and thus combine business with pleasure. But who? That was the rub." (U16.528)
"Also, without being actually positive, it struck him a great field was to be opened up in the line of opening up new routes to keep pace with the times apropos of the Fishguard-Rosslare route which, it was mooted, was once more on the tapis in the circumlocution departments with the usual quantity of red tape and dillydallying of effete fogeydom and dunderheads generally. A great opportunity there certainly was for push and enterprise to meet the travelling needs of the public at large, the average man, i.e. Brown, Robinson and Co.
It was a subject of regret and absurd as well on the face of it and no small blame to our vaunted society that the man in the street, when the system really needed toning up, for the matter of a couple of paltry pounds was debarred from seeing more of the world they lived in instead of being always and ever cooped up since my old stick-in-the-mud took me for a wife." ([U16.531])
"After all, hang it, they had their eleven and more humdrum months of it and merited a radical change of venue after the grind of city life in the summertime for choice when dame Nature is at her spectacular best constituting nothing short of a new lease of life. There were equally excellent opportunities for vacationists in the home island, delightful sylvan spots for rejuvenation, offering a plethora of attractions as well as a bracing tonic for the system in and around Dublin and its picturesque environs even," (U16.544)
" Poulaphouca to which there was a steamtram," (U16.551)
"but also farther away from the madding crowd," (17.551)
"in Wicklow, rightly termed the garden of Ireland, an ideal neighbourhood for elderly wheelmen, so long as it didn't come down," (U16.552)
"and in the wilds of Donegal, where if report spoke true, the coup d'oeil was exceedingly grand, though the lastnamed locality was not easily getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that it might be considering the signal benefits to be derived from it," (U16.554)
"while Howth with its historic associations and otherwise, Silken Thomas, Grace O'Malley, George IV, rhododendrons several hundred feet above sealevel was a favourite haunt with all sorts and conditions of men especially in the spring when young men's fancy," (U16.557)
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