"Galeria Becche, Santiago, Chile.
There was no message evidently, as he took particular notice." (U16.489)
"Though not an implicit believer in the lurid story narrated (or the eggsniping transaction for that matter despite William Tell and the Lazarillo-Don Cesar de Bazan incident depicted in Maritana on which occasion the former's ball passed through the latter's hat) having detected a discrepancy between his name (assuming he was the person he represented himself to be and not sailing under false colours after having boxed the compass on the strict q.t. somewhere) and the fictitious addressee of the missive which made him nourish some suspicions of our friend's bona fides" (U16.491)
"nevertheless it reminded him in a way of a longcherished plan he meant to one day realise some Wednesday or Saturday of travelling to London via long sea" (U16.499)
"not to say that he had ever travelled extensively to any great extent but he was at heart a born adventurer though by a trick of fate he had consistently remained a landlubber except you call going to Holyhead which was his longest." (U16.501)
"Margate with mixed bathing and firstrate hydros and spas," (U16.519)
"Eastbourne," (U16.520)
"Scarborough, Margate and so on, beautiful Bournemouth, the Channel islands and similar bijou spots, which might prove highly remunerative. Not, of course, with a hole and corner scratch company or local ladies on the job, witness Mrs C P M'Coy type lend me your valise and I'll post you the ticket." (U16.520)
"No, something top notch, an all star Irish cast, the Tweedy-Flower grand opera company with his own legal consort as leading lady as a sort of counterblast to the Elster Grimes and Moody-Manners," (U16.524)

Fanny Moody (1866 - 1945) was a soprano opera singer, born in Redruth, Cornwall in a musical family (her sisters Lily and Hilda Moody were also opera singers). She made her debut as Arline in 'The Bohemian Girl' with the Carl Rosa Opera Co (1887) and stayed with the company until 1890; she then sang under Augustus Harris at Covent Garden and Drury Lane (1890-94). Her roles included Eileen in 'The Lily of Killarney', Micaela in 'Carmen", Marguerite in 'Faust', as well as leading roles in 'La Juive', 'I Puritani' and several Wagner operas.
Charles Manners (1857 - 1935) was a bass opera singer. His real name was Southcote Mansergh. He was born in London, son of Colonel Mansergh, an Irishman. He studied music with Dr. O'Donogue in Dublin, the Royal Academy of Music in London, and in Italy. He sang with the D'Oyly Carte organization in 1882, advancing from a member of the chorus, to creating the part of Private Willis in 'Iolanthe' at the Savoy. In 1883, he left the D'Oyly Carte and the Savoy. He was principal bass with the Carl Rosa Opera Company for two years, then spent four years at Covent Garden. His Covent Garden debut was as Bertramo in 'Roberto il Diavolo' (1890), opposite Fanny Moody.

Moody and Manners married in 1890. The couple appeared together in the London premiere of Tchaikovsky's 'Eugene Onegin' (Olympic Theatre, 1892). They formed a concert party that later became the Moody-Manners Opera Company (1894), thereafter split into A and B. They toured Canada and South Africa (1896-97) and extensively in the British provinces and Ireland. Manners performed in the Company and served as its managing director. The Moody-Manners A Company was for some time the largest opera company ever to tour in Great Britain. The Moody-Manners Companies were disbanded before World War I.
"but also farther away from the madding crowd," (17.551)
"in Wicklow, rightly termed the garden of Ireland, an ideal neighbourhood for elderly wheelmen, so long as it didn't come down," (U16.552)
"and in the wilds of Donegal, where if report spoke true, the coup d'oeil was exceedingly grand, though the lastnamed locality was not easily getatable so that the influx of visitors was not as yet all that it might be considering the signal benefits to be derived from it," (U16.554)
"though it had its own toll of deaths by falling off the cliffs by design or accidentally, usually, by the way, on their left leg, it being only about three quarters of an hour's run from the pillar." (U6.561)
"Because of course uptodate tourist travelling was as yet merely in its infancy, so to speak, and the accommodation left much to be desired. Interesting to fathom, it seemed to him, from a motive of curiosity pure and simple, was whether it was the traffic that created the route or viceversa or the two sides in fact. He turned back the other side of the card, picture, and passed it along to Stephen." (U16.563)
"- I seen a Chinese one time, related the doughty narrator, that had little pills like putty and he put them in the water and they opened, and every pill was something different. One was a ship, another was a house, another was a flower. Cooks rats in your soup, he appetisingly added, the Chinese does.
Possibly perceiving an expression of dubiosity on their faces, the globetrotter went on, adhering to his adventures." (U16.570)
"That was why they thought the park murders of the invincibles was done by foreigners on account of them using knives." (U16.590)

On May 6th 1882, Thomas Henry Burke (Permanent Under Secretary for Ireland) and Lord Frederick Cavendish (newly appointed Chief Secretary for Ireland) were murdered in Phoenix Park by members of the Invincibles, a radical Irish nationalist secret society. Cavendish had just arrived in Ireland, and the two men were on their way to the Viceregal Lodge. The killers used surgical knives: rather than stabbed, the victims were slashed with long cuts all over their body. Dr. Thomas Myles, surgeon at the nearby Steevens's Hospital, was summoned -to no avail- for medical assistance to the victims.
Eumaeus Pages: