"In old age she takes up with gospellers (one stayed with her at New Place and drank a quart of sack the town council paid for but in which bed he slept it skills not to ask) and heard she had a soul." (U9.802)
"She read or had read to her his chapbooks preferring them to the Merry Wives and, loosing her nightly waters on the jordan, she thought over Hooks and Eyes for Believers' Breeches and The Most Spiritual Snuffbox to Make the Most Devout Souls Sneeze. Venus has twisted her lips in prayer." (U9.805)
"Agenbite of inwit: remorse of conscience. It is an age of exhausted whoredom groping for its god.
— History shows that to be true, inquit Eglintonus Chronolologos. The ages succeed one another. But we have it on high authority that a man's worst enemies shall be those of his own house and family. I feel that Russell is right. What do we care for his wife or father? I should say that only family poets have family lives." (U9.809)
"Falstaff was not a family man. I feel that the fat knight is his supreme creation.
Lean, he lay back. Shy, deny thy kindred, the unco guid. Shy, supping with the godless, he sneaks the cup. A sire in Ultonian Antrim bade it him. Visits him here on quarter days. Mr Magee, sir, there's a gentleman to see you. Me? Says he's your father, sir." (U9.815)
"Give me my Wordsworth. Enter Magee Mor Matthew, a rugged rough rugheaded kern, in strossers with a buttoned codpiece, his nether stocks bemired with clauber of ten forests, a wand of wilding in his hand.
Your own? He knows your old fellow. The widower." (U9.820)
"Hurrying to her squalid deathlair from gay Paris on the quayside I touched his hand. The voice, new warmth, speaking. Dr Bob Kenny is attending her. The eyes that wish me well. But do not know me.
— A father, Stephen said, battling against hopelessness, is a necessary evil." (U9.825)
"He wrote the play in the months that followed his father's death. If you hold that he, a greying man with two marriageable daughters, with thirtyfive years of life, nel mezzo del cammin di nostra vita, with fifty of experience, is the beardless undergraduate from Wittenberg then you must hold that his seventyyear old mother is the lustful queen. No. The corpse of John Shakespeare does not walk the night. From hour to hour it rots and rots. He rests, disarmed of fatherhood, having devised that mystical estate upon his son." (U9.829)
"Boccaccio's Calandrino was the first and last man who felt himself with child." (U9.836)
"Fatherhood, in the sense of conscious begetting, is unknown to man. It is a mystical estate, an apostolic succession, from only begetter to only begotten." (U9.837)
"On that mystery and not on the madonna which the cunning Italian intellect flung to the mob of Europe the church is founded and founded irremovably because founded, like the world, macro and microcosm, upon the void." (U9.839)
"Upon incertitude, upon unlikelihood. Amor matris, subjective and objective genitive, may be the only true thing in life." (U9.842)
"Paternity may be a legal fiction." (U9.844)
"Who is the father of any son that any son should love him or he any son?
What the hell are you driving at?
I know. Shut up. Blast you! I have reasons.
Amplius. Adhuc. Iterum. Postea.
Are you condemned to do this?" (U9.844)
"— They are sundered by a bodily shame so steadfast that the criminal annals of the world, stained with all other incests and bestialities,, hardly record its breach. Sons with mothers, sires with daughters, lesbic sisters, loves that dare not speak their name, nephews with grandmothers, jailbirds with keyholes, queens with prize bulls. The son unborn mars beauty: born, he brings pain, divides affection, increases care. He is a new male: his growth is his father's decline, his youth his father's envy, his friend his father's enemy." (U9.850)
"In rue Monsieur-le-Prince I thought it." (9.858)
"- What links them in nature? An instant of blind rut.
Am I father? If I were?
Shrunken uncertain hand.
— Sabellius, the African, subtlest heresiarch of all the beasts of the field, held that the Father was Himself His Own Son." (U9.859)
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