"But those that came to the land of the free remember the land of bondage. And they will come again and with a vengeance, no cravens, the sons of Granuaile, the champions of Kathleen ni Houlihan.
- Perfectly true, says Bloom. But my point was...
- We are a long time waiting for that day, citizen, says Ned. Since the poor old woman told us that the French were on the sea and landed at Killala." (U12.1372)
"- Ay, says John Wyse. We fought for the royal Stuarts that reneged us against the Williamites and they betrayed us." (U12.1379)
"Remember Limerick and the broken treatystone." (U12.1380)
A SV of the Limerick treaty stone.
"We gave our best blood to France and Spain, the wild geese. Fontenoy, eh? And Sarsfield and O'Donnell, duke of Tetuan in Spain, and Ulysses Browne of Camus that was fieldmarshal to Maria Teresa. But what did we ever get for it?" (U12.1381)
"-The French! says the citizen. Set of dancing masters! Do you know what it is? They were never worth a roasted fart to Ireland." (U12.1385)

A PC from 1903 caricatures the 'dance' of the European leaders.
"Aren't they trying to make an entente cordial now at Tay Pay's dinnerparty with perfidious Albion? Firebrands of Europe and they always were.
- Conspuez les Fran├žais, says Lenehan, nobbling his beer." (U12.1386)

A French PC illustrating the 'entente cordiale' between France and perfidious Albion. Ironically, Joan of Arc is burning at the stake in the background!
"- And as for the Prooshians and the Hanoverians, says Joe, haven't we had enough of those sausageeating bastards on the throne from George the elector" (U12.1390)
"down to the German lad" (U12.1392)
"and the flatulent old bitch that's dead?" (U12.1392)

The FOBTsD, here in a portrait by Lafayette of Dublin.
"Jesus, I had to laugh at the way he came out with that about the old one with the winkers on her, blind drunk in her royal palace every night of God, old Vic, with her jorum of mountain dew" (U12.1393)

'Mountain dew' is a slang term similar to 'moonshine' = home-distilled alcohol, especially where illegal. It is made from local products such as corn, potatoes, grapes, cane sugar etc. Irish mountain dew (aka as poteen), was potato based. This PC shows a still in Connemara, with children in charge of watching it.
"and her coachman carting her up body and bones to roll into bed and she pulling him by the whiskers and singing him old bits of songs about Ehren on the Rhine and come where the boose is cheaper." (U12.1395)

'Come where the booze is cheaper' is a music-hall song with lyrics by E.W. Rogers and music by A.E. Durandeau. This PC from 1900 suggests that the booze is cheaper in Ireland!
'Mountain dew' is a slang term similar to 'moonshine' = home-distilled alcohol, especially where illegal. It is made from local products such as corn, potatoes, grapes, cane sugar etc. Irish mountain dew (aka as poteen), was potato based. The PC (and photograph from which it derives) show a still in Connemara, with children in charge of watching it.
"- Well! says J.J. We have Edward the peacemaker now.
- Tell that to a fool, says the citizen. There's a bloody sight more pox than pax about that boyo. Edward Guelph-Wettin!" (U12.1399)

From EB 1911: "In his first two years the king had already earned the title of Edward the Peacemaker. Treaties of arbitration were concluded by Great Britain with France, Spain, Italy, Germany and Portugal in 1903 and 1904. This reputation was confirmed in the years which followed. The entente cordiale with France was promoted by his influence, notably by his reception of President Fallieres in England in 1908. The conclusion of the Anglo-Russian agreement (1907), hotly criticised in Radical quarters, was attributed with some reason to royal policy."
"- And what do you think, says Joe, of the holy boys, the priests and bishops of Ireland doing up his room in Maynooth in His Satanic Majesty's racing colours" (U12.1402)
"and sticking up pictures of all the horses his jockeys rode. The earl of Dublin, no less." (U12.1404)

This is the stallion Persimmon (1893 - 1908), one of the Prince of Wales' most successful racing horses. One of Persimmon's offspring was the filly Sceptre, who won in 1902 every classic race except the Derby.
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