"the three birthplaces of the first duke of Wellington," (U12.1459)

Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington (1769 - 1852) was an Irish-born British statesman, and a leading military and political figure of the 19c. who rose to prominence in the Napoleonic Wars. The precise date and place of his birth are not known. The date was end of April, or May 1st, 1769. The place was either Mornington House in Dublin (his family's social season residence in the capital), or Dangan Castle in Co. Meath (his family seat). As a member of the Protestant British squirearchy ruling Ireland, Wellington was touchy about his Irish origins. An enthusiastic Gael once commended him as a famous Irishman and he replied "A man can be born in a stable, and yet not be an animal." Hence, I think, the 3 birthplaces.
"the rock of Cashel, the bog of Allen," U12.1460)
"the Henry Street Warehouse," (U12.1461)
"Fingal's Cave - all these moving scenes are still there for us today rendered more beautiful still by the waters of sorrow which have passed over them and by the rich incrustations of time.
- Show us over the drink, says I. Which is which?
- That's mine, says Joe, as the devil said to the dead policeman." (U12.1461)
"- And I belong to a race too, says Bloom, that is hated and persecuted. Also now. This very moment. This very instant.
Gob, he near burnt his fingers with the butt of his old cigar." (U12.1467)
"- Robbed, says he. Plundered. Insulted. Persecuted. Taking what belongs to us by right. At this very moment, says he, putting up his fist, sold by auction off in Morocco like slaves or cattles." (U12.1470)
"- Are you talking about the new Jerusalem? says the citizen." (U12.1473)
"- I'm talking about injustice, says Bloom.
- Right, says John Wyse. Stand up to it then with force like men.
That's an almanac picture for you. Mark for a softnosed bullet." (U12.1474)
" Old lardyface standing up to the business end of a gun. Gob, he'd adorn a sweepingbrush, so he would, if he only had a nurse's apron on him." (U12.1476)
" And then he collapses all of a sudden, twisting around all the opposite, as limp as a wet rag." (U12.1478)
"- But it's no use, says he. Force, hatred, history, all that. That's not life for men and women, insult and hatred. And everybody knows that it's the very opposite of that that is really life.
- What? says Alf." (U12.1481)
"- Love, says Bloom. I mean the opposite of hatred. I must go now, says he to John Wyse. Just round to the court a moment to see if Martin is there. If he comes just say I'll be back in a second. Just a moment.
Who's hindering you? And off he pops like greased lightning.
- A new apostle to the gentiles, says the citizen. Universal love." (U12.1485)
" - Well, says John Wyse, isn't that what we're told? Love your neighbours.
- That chap? says the citizen. Beggar my neighbour is his motto. Love, Moya! He's a nice pattern of a Romeo and Juliet." (U12.1490)
"Love loves to love love. Nurse loves the new chemist. Constable 14 A loves Mary Kelly. Gerty MacDowell loves the boy that has the bicycle. M.B. loves a fair genteman. Li Chi Han lovey up kissy Cha Pu Chow." (U12.1493)
"Jumbo, the elephant, loves Alice, the elephant." (U12.1496)

Jumbo the elephant was born in Africa, captured in 1861, and reared in the Jardin des Plantes in Paris. He grew to a huge size (Ht 11.5 ft, Wt 6.5 tons), and worked for 20 years in the London Zoo. He was bought by Barnum for $10.000, crossed the Atlantic amidst enormous publicity, and joined the Barnum & Bailey show in 1882. He was hit by a train and died in 1885.
Jumbo was immensely popular. His name became synonymous with 'huge' or 'gigantic.' He is seen here on 2 period trade cards, titled 'Prospective Fun for the Children' and 'Reaching for Candy.'

While in the Jardin des Plantes in Paris, Jumbo was exhibited alongside Alice, an African female elephant. I have not found her picture yet.
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