"Burke's! outflings my lord Stephen, giving the cry, and a tag and bobtail of all them after, cockerel, jackanapes, welsher, pilldoctor, punctual Bloom at heels with a universal grabbing at headgear, ashplants, bilbos, Panama hats and scabbards, Zermatt alpenstocks and what not. A dedale of lusty youth, noble every student there. Nurse Callan taken aback in the hallway cannot stay them nor smiling surgeon coming downstairs with news of placentation ended, a full pound if a milligramme. They hark him on. The door! It is open?" (U14.1391)
"They are out, tumultuously, off for a minute's race, all bravely legging it, Burke's of Denzille and Holles their ulterior goal." (U14.1398)
"Them all being gone, a glance of motherwit helping, he whispers close in going: Madam, when comes the storkbird for thee?" (U14.1404)

The storkbird had come a few days earlier, June 3rd 1904, for a woman in Argentina :)
"By heaven, Theodore Purefoy, thou hast done a doughty deed and no botch! Thou art, I vow, the remarkablest progenitor barring none in this chaffering allincluding most farraginous chronicle. Astounding! In her lay a Godframed Godgiven preformed possibility which thou hast fructified with thy modicum of man's work. Cleave to her! Serve! Toil on, labour like a very bandog and let scholarment and all Malthusiasts go hang. Thou art all their daddies, Theodore." (U14.1410)
"Dost envy Darby Dullman there with his Joan? A canting jay and a rheumeyed curdog is all their progeny. Pshaw, I tell thee! He is a mule, a dead gasteropod, without vim or stamina, not worth a cracked kreutzer." (U14.1419)

'Darby and Joan' is a 19c. song with Lyrics by Frederic E. Weatherly and Music by L. Molloy. An old childless couple reminisces on their life, and their fifty years of marriage.
"Copulation without population!" (U14.1422)
"No, say I! Herod's" (U14.1422)
"slaughter of the innocents were the truer name." (U14.1422)
"Thou sawest thy America, thy lifetask, and didst charge to cover like the transpontine bison." (U14.1430)
"How saith Zarathustra? Deine Kuh Trübsal melkest Du. Nun trinkst Du die süsse Milch des Euters." (U14.1431)
"Drink, man, an udderful! Mother's milk, Purefoy, the milk of human kin, milk too of those burgeoning stars overhead, Mother's milk, Purefoy, the milk of human kin, milk too of those burgeoning stars overhead, rutilant in thin rainvapour, punch milk, such as those rioters will quaff in their guzzlingden, milk of madness," (U14.1432)
"the honeymilk of Canaan's land. Thy cow's dug was tough, what? Ay, but her milk is hot and sweet and fattening. No dollop this but thick rich bonnyclaber." (U14.1436)
"To her, old patriarch! Pap! Per deam Partulam et Pertundam nunc est bibendum!" (U14.1438)
"Where you slep las nigh? Timothy of the battered naggin. Like ole Billyo. Any brollies or gumboots in the fambly? Where the Henry Nevil's sawbones and ole clo? Sorra one o me knows. Hurrah there, Dix! Forward to the ribbon counter. Where's Punch? All serene. Jay, look at the drunken minister coming out of the maternity hospal!" (U14.1440)
"Benedicat vos omnipotens Deus, Pater et Filius. A make, mister. The Denzille lane boys. Hell, blast ye! Scoot. Righto, Isaacs, shove em out of the bleeding limelight. Yous join uz, dear sir? No hentrusion in life. Lou heap good man. Allee samee dis bunch. En avant, mes enfants! Fire away number one on the gun. Burke's! Burke's! Thence they advanced five parasangs." (U14.1445)
"Slattery's mounted foot." (U14.1450)

The song 'Slattery's Mounted Fut' by Percy French (1854 - 1920) celebrates drinking and staying alive. It starts:
'You've heard o' Julius Ceasar, and the great Napolean, too,
An' how the Cork Militia beat the Turks at Waterloo;
But there's a page of glory that, as yet, remains uncut,
An' that's the Martial story o' the Shlathery's Mounted Fut.'
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