"As he awaited the fatal signal he tested the edge of his horrible weapon by honing it upon his brawny forearm" (U12.614)
"or decapitated in rapid succession a flock of sheep which had been provided by the admirers of his fell but necessary office." (U12.616)
"On a handsome mahogany table near him were neatly arranged the quartering knife, the various finely tempered disembowelling appliances (specially supplied by the worldfamous firm of cutlers, Messrs John Round and Sons, Sheffield), a terracotta saucepan for the reception of the duodenum, colon, blind intestine and appendix etc when successfully extracted" (U12.618)
"and two commodious milkjugs destined to receive the most precious blood of the most precious victim. The housesteward of the amalgamated cats' and dogs' home was in attendance to convey these vessels when replenished to that beneficent institution." (U12.623)
"that she would never forget her hero boy who went to his death with a song on his lips as if he were but going to a hurling match in Clonturk park." (U14.644)

Hurling is an outdoor team sport and one of Ireland's native Gaelic Games, promoted by the Gaelic Athletic Association. It is played with a wooden axe-shaped stick called a hurley, and a ball. It shares a number of features with Gaelic football, such as the field and goals, number of players, and much terminology. There is a similar game for women called camogie. This photo shows an Irish hurling team in the 1920s (including J.J. Glavin in the middle).
"She brought back to his recollection the happy days of blissful childhood together on the banks of Anna Liffey when they had indulged in the innocent pastimes of the young and, oblivious of the dreadful present, they both laughed heartily, all the spectators, including the venerable pastor, joining in the general merriment." (U12.646)
"That monster audience simply rocked with delight." (U12.650)
"But anon they were overcome with grief and clasped their hands for the last time. A fresh torrent of tears burst from their lachrymal ducts and the vast concourse of people, touched to the inmost core, broke into heartrending sobs, not the least affected being the aged prebendary himself." (U12.651)
"Big strong men, officers of the peace and genial giants of the royal Irish constabulary, were making frank use of their handkerchiefs and it is safe to say that there was not a dry eye in that record assemblage." (U12.655)
"A most romantic incident occurred when a handsome young Oxford graduate, noted for his chivalry towards the fair sex, stepped forward and, presenting his visiting card, bankbook and genealogical tree," (U12.658)
"solicited the hand of the hapless young lady, requesting her to name the day, and was accepted on the spot. Every lady in the audience was presented with a tasteful souvenir of the occasion in the shape of a skull and crossbones brooch, a timely and generous act which evoked a fresh outburst of emotion:" (U12.661)
"and when the gallant young Oxonian (the bearer, by the way, of one of the most timehonoured names in Albion's history) placed on the finger of his blushing fiancée an expensive engagement ring with emeralds set in the form of a fourleaved shamrock the excitement knew no bounds." (U12.665)
"With his mailed gauntlet he brushed away a furtive tear and was overheard by those privileged burghers who happened to be in his immediate entourage to murmur to himself in a faltering undertone:
- God blimey if she aint a clinker, that there bleeding tart. Blimey it makes me kind of bleeding cry, straight, it does, when I sees her cause I thinks of my old mashtub what's waiting for me down Limehouse way." (U12.673)
"a lot of colleen bawns going about with temperance beverages and selling medals and oranges and lemonade and a few old dry buns, gob, flahoolagh entertainment, don't be talking. Ireland sober is Ireland free." (U12.689)

This PC shows a Temperance Hall in Longford, North Ireland.
"- Afraid he'll bite you? says the citizen, jeering.
- No, says I. But he might take my leg for a lamppost.
So he calls the old dog over.
- What's on you, Garry? says he." (U15.701)
"Then he starts hauling and mauling and talking to him in Irish and the old towser growling, letting on to answer, like a duet in the opera. Such growling you never heard as they let off between them. Someone that has nothing better to do ought to write a letter pro bono publico to the papers about the muzzling order for a dog the like of that. Growling and grousing and his eye all bloodshot from the drouth is in it and the hydrophobia dropping out of his jaws." (U12.705)
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