"Out of shells, periwinkles with a pin, off trees," (U8.856)
"snails out of the ground the French eat," (U8.857)
"out of the sea with bait on a hook. Silly fish learn nothing in a thousand years. If you didn't know risky putting anything into your mouth. Poisonous berries. Johnny Magories. Roundness you think good. Gaudy colour warns you off. One fellow told another and so on." (U8.857)
"Try it on the dog first. Led on by the smell or the look. Tempting fruit. Ice cones. Cream. Instinct. Orangegroves for instance. Need artificial irrigation. Bleibtreustrasse." (U8.861)
"Yes but what about oysters? Unsightly like a clot of phlegm. Filthy shells." (U8.863)
"Devil to open them too. Who found them out? Garbage, sewage they feed on." (U8.864)

Tit-bits (1890) offers an answer.
"Fizz and Red bank oysters. Effect on the sexual. Aphrodis. He was in the Red Bank this morning. Was he oysters old fish at table. Perhaps he young flesh in bed. No. June has no ar no oysters." (U8.865)
"But there are people like things high. Tainted game. Jugged hare. First catch your hare. Chinese eating eggs fifty years old, blue and green again. Dinner of thirty courses. Each dish harmless might mix inside. Idea for a poison mystery. That archduke Leopold was it no yes or was it Otto one of those Habsburgs? Or who was it used to eat the scruff off his own head? Cheapest lunch in town. Of course aristocrats, then the others copy to be in the fashion. Milly too rock oil and flour." (U8.868)
"Raw pastry I like myself. Half the catch of oysters they throw back in the sea to keep up the price." (U8.874)
"Cheap no-one would buy. Caviare. Do the grand. Hock in green glasses. Swell blowout. Lady this. Powdered bosom pearls. The Elite. Crème de la crème. They want special dishes to pretend they're. Hermit with a platter of pulse keep down the stings of the flesh. Know me come eat with me. Royal sturgeon high sheriff, Coffey, the butcher, right to venisons of the forest from his ex. Send him back the half of a cow." (U8.876)
"Spread I saw down in the Master of the Rolls' kitchen area. Whitehatted chef like a rabbi." (U8.881)
"Combustible duck. Curly cabbage a la duchesse de Parme. Just as well to write it on the bill of fare so you can know what you've eaten." (U8.883)

The menu of a dinner meal served by the Shelbourne Hotel on July 20th 1908. French words indeed are an ingredient. I would love to taste the Crème Diplomate!
"Too many drugs spoil the broth. I know it myself. Dosing it with Edwards' desiccated soup. Geese stuffed silly for them. Lobsters boiled alive." (U8.884)
"Do ptake some ptarmigan. Wouldn't mind being a waiter in a swell hotel. Tips, evening dress, halfnaked ladies. May I tempt you to a little more filleted lemon sole, miss Dubedat? Yes, do bedad. And she did bedad. Huguenot name I expect that. A miss Dubedat lived in Killiney, I remember. Du, de la, French." (U8.886)
"Still it's the same fish, perhaps old Micky Hanlon of Moore street ripped the guts out of making money, hand over fist, finger in fishes' gills, can't write his name on a cheque, think he was painting the landscape with his mouth twisted. Moooikill A Aitcha Ha. Ignorant as a kish of brogues, worth fifty thousand pounds." (U8.891)

A period ad for Michael & P. Hanlon (Fish, Oyster and Ice Merchants) at 20 & 21 Moore street. Probably the very Micky who can't write his name on a cheque.
"Stuck on the pane two flies buzzed, stuck." (U8.896)
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