"of the second edition (30 January 1893) of the grand annual Christmas pantomime Sinbad the Sailor (produced by R. Shelton 26 December 1892, written by Greenleaf Whittier, scenery by George A. Jackson and Cecil Hicks, costumes by Mrs and Miss Whelan under the personal supervision of Mrs Michael Gunn, ballets by Jessie Noir, harlequinade by Thomas Otto) and sung by Nelly Bouverist, principal girl?" (U17.421)

(Image courtesy of the ZJJF)
"Firstly, oscillation between events of imperial and of local interest," (U17.428)
"the anticipated diamond jubilee of Queen Victoria (born 1820, acceded 1837) and the posticipated opening of the new municipal fish market:" (U17.428)
"secondly, apprehension of opposition from extreme circles on the questions of the respective visits of Their Royal Highnesses the duke and duchess of York (real) and of His Majesty King Brian Boru (imaginary): thirdly, a conflict between professional etiquette and professional emulation concerning the recent erections of the Grand Lyric Hall on Burgh Quay and the Theatre Royal in Hawkins street:" (U17.430)

'Duke of York' is a title of nobility in the British peerage, usually given to the second son of the British monarch. H.R.H. Prince George (1865 - 1936) was created Duke of York in 1892, and his wife Mary (m. 1893) was the Duchess. He was the second son of Edward VII & Alexandra, and later King George V.
"fourthly, distraction resultant from compassion for Nelly Bouverist's non-intellectual, non-political, non-topical expression of countenance and concupiscence caused by Nelly Bouverist's revelations of white articles of non-intellectual, non-political, non-topical underclothing while she (Nelly Bouverist) was in the articles:" (U17.436)
"fifthly, the difficulties of the selection of appropriate music and humorous allusions from Everybody's Book of Jokes (1000 pages and a laugh in every one):" (U17.440)
"sixthly, the rhymes, homophonous and cacophonous, associated with the names of the new lord mayor, Daniel Tallon," (U17.443)

Daniel Tallon was Lord Mayor of Dublin 1898 - 1900. I could not find his picture, but this is his signature on official Mansion House stationary.
"and the new solicitorgeneral, Dunbar Plunket Barton." (U17.445)

The Solicitor-General for Ireland was the holder of an Irish and then (from the Act of Union 1800) United Kingdom government office. The holder was a deputy to the Attorney-General for Ireland, and advised the Crown on Irish legal matters.

Sir Dunbar Plunket Barton held the position 1898 - 1900, followed by George Wright 1900 - 1903. James Henry Musson Campbell was S-G for Ireland in 1904. This photo shows Sir Edward Carson: he was S-G for Ireland in 1892, and S-G for England and Wales in 1904.
"How many previous encounters proved their preexisting acquaintance?
Two. The first in the lilacgarden of Matthew Dillon's house, Medina Villa, Kimmage road, Roundtown, in 1887, in the company of Stephen's mother," (U17.466)
"Did their conversation on the subject of these reminiscences reveal a third connecting link between them?
Mrs Riordan (Dante), a widow of independent means, had resided in the house of Stephen's parents from 1 September 1888 to 29 December 1891 and had also resided during the years 1892, 1893 and 1894 in the City Arms Hotel owned by Elizabeth O'Dowd of 54 Prussia street where, during parts of the years 1893 and 1894 she had been a constant informant of Bloom who resided also in the same hotel," (U17.477)

Not her, but how I imagine Mrs. Riordan.
"being at that time a clerk in the employment of Joseph Cuffe of 5 Smithfield for the superintendence of sales in the adjacent Dublin Cattle market on the North Circular road." (U17.484)
"Had he performed any special corporal work of mercy for her?
He had sometimes propelled her on warm summer evenings, an infirm widow of independent, if limited, means, in her convalescent bathchair with slow revolutions of its wheels as far as the corner of the North Circular road opposite Mr Gavin Low's place of business where she had remained for a certain time scanning through his onelensed binocular field glasses unrecognisable citizens on tramcars, roadster bicycles equipped with inflated pneumatic tyres, hackney carriages, tandems, private and hired landaus, dogcarts," (U17.487)
An advertisement for various 'Invalid Comforts' including the bath chair (ILN, 1899)
"ponytraps and brakes passing from the city to the Phoenix Park and vice versa." (U17.495)
"Why could he then support that his vigil with the greater equanimity?
Because in middle youth he had often sat observing through a rondel of bossed glass of a multicoloured pane the spectacle offered with continual changes of the thoroughfare without, pedestrians, quadrupeds, velocipedes, vehicles, passing slowly, quickly, evenly, round and round and round the rim of a round and round precipitous globe." (U17.497)
"Were there no means still remaining to him to achieve the rejuvenation which these reminiscences divulged to a younger companion rendered the more desirable?
The indoor exercises, formerly intermittently practised, subsequently abandoned, prescribed in Eugen Sandow's Physical Strength and How to Obtain It which, designed particularly for commercial men engaged in sedentary occupations," (U17.509)

The Sandow method was advertised for both men and women, and included charts and advise for children as young as 7 years.
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