"They were about him here and there, with heads still bowed in their crimson halters, waiting for it to melt in their stomachs. Something like those mazzoth: it's that sort of bread: unleavened shewbread. Look at them. Now I bet it makes them feel happy. Lollipop. It does. Yes, bread of angels it's called. There's a big idea behind it, kind of kingdom of God is within you feel." (U5.356)
"First communicants." (U5.361)
"Hokypoky penny a lump. Then feel all like one family party, same in the theatre, all in the same swim. They do. I'm sure of that. Not so lonely. In our confraternity. Then come out a big spreeish. Let off steam." (U5.362)

According to the Oxford English Dictionary 'hokey pokey' comes from 'hocus pocus,' the traditional magician's incantation. 'Hocus pocus' in turn may be a deformation of the Latin 'Hoc est Corpus meum' (= This is my Body, said by the Catholic priest during the mass), in a mocking anti-Catholic parody of transubstantiation. Transubstantiation is the change of the substance of bread and wine into that of the body and blood of Christ that occurs in the Eucharist. 'Hokey pokey' was also a 19c. slang term for ice cream (more specifically that sold by street vendors), that possibly cost a penny per scoop.
"Thing is if you really believe in it. Lourdes cure, waters of oblivion" (U5.364)
"and the Knock apparition," (U5.365)

Knock (Irish An Cnoc = the Hill) is a village in Co. Mayo. It was the site, on August 21st 1879, of an apparition of the Virgin Mary, together with St Joseph and St John the Evangelist. Hence Knock became one of Europe's major Roman Catholic Marian shrines, alongside Lourdes and Fatima. Nowadays 1.5M people visit Knock annually (including Pope John Paul II in 1979, the centenary of the apparition).
On the evening of August 21st 1879, 15 people (5-75 year old, the first being Mary McLoughlin, housekeeper to Archdeacon Kavanagh), witnessed an apparition of the Blessed Virgin Mary (BVM), St Joseph, and St John the Evangelist at the south gable end of the Church of St John the Baptist in Knock. The BVM was described as life-size, standing about 2 feet above the ground. She wore a white cloak, a crown, and over the crown a rose. St Joseph stood on her right. He also wore white robes, his head bent in respect toward the BVM, and appeared somewhat aged. St John stood to the left of the BVM. He wore a long robe and a mitre, was partly turned away from the others, and appeared to be preaching. He held open a large book in his left hand, and his right hand was raised. Behind the figures, to the left of St John, was an altar with a lamb with a cross (Agnus Dei). Angels hovered around the altar the whole time. The witnesses stood in the pouring rain for some 2 hours reciting the Rosary. An ecclesiastical Commission of Inquiry was established by the Archbishop of Tuam, Most Rev. Dr. John MacHale. The Commission's verdict deemed the testimony of all the witnesses trustworthy and satisfactory. This card (1881), issued by St Joseph's Union in NY, was sold as a fundraiser for its 'Homeless Child' project.
"statues bleeding. Old fellow asleep near that confession box. Hence those snores." (U5.366)
"Blind faith. Safe in the arms of kingdom come. Lulls all pain. Wake this time next year." (U5.367)
"He saw the priest stow the communion cup away, well in, and kneel an instant before it, showing a large grey bootsole from under the lace affair he had on. Suppose he lost the pin of his. He wouldn't know what to do to. Bald spot behind." (U5.369)
"Letters on his back: I.N.R.I.? No: I.H.S. Molly told me one time I asked her. I have sinned: or no: I have suffered, it is." (U5.372)

From the CE 1910: "IHS is a monogram of the name of Jesus Christ, from its Greek spelling. IHS is sometimes wrongly understood as 'Jesus Hominum Salvator' = Jesus the Saviour of Men. St Ignatius of Loyola adopted the monogram in his seal as general of the Society of Jesus (1541), and thus it became the emblem of his institute." IHS is usually associated with the Catholic communion, and more specifically with the Jesuit order.
"And the other one? Iron nails ran in." (U5.373)

I.N.R.I. is a Latin acronym for 'Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum' = Jesus of Nazareth King of the Jews. It is the title that Pontius Pilate had written over the head of Jesus Christ on the cross (John 19:19). INRI commonly appears in depictions of the crucifixion.
"Meet one Sunday after the rosary. Do not deny my request. Turn up with a veil and black bag. Dusk and the light behind her. She might be here with a ribbon round her neck and do the other thing all the same on the sly. Their character." (U5.375)
"That fellow that turned queen's evidence on the invincibles he used to receive the, Carey was his name, the communion every morning. This very church. Peter Carey, yes. No, Peter Claver I am thinking of. Denis Carey. And just imagine that. Wife and six children at home. And plotting that murder all the time.
Those crawthumpers, now that's a good name for them, there's always something shiftylooking about them. They're not straight men of business either. O, no, she's not here: the flower: no, no. By the way, did I tear up that envelope? Yes: under the bridge." (U5.378)
"The priest was rinsing out the chalice: then he tossed off the dregs smartly. Wine. Makes it more aristocratic than for example if he drank what they are used to Guinness's porter or some temperance beverage" (U5.386)
"Wheatley's Dublin hop bitters or Cantrell and Cochrane's ginger ale (aromatic)." (U5.389)
"Doesn't give them any of it: shew wine: only the other. Cold comfort. Pious fraud but quite right: otherwise they'd have one old boozer worse than another coming along, cadging for a drink. Queer the whole atmosphere of the. Quite right. Perfectly right that is.
Mr Bloom looked back towards the choir. Not going to be any music. Pity. Who has the organ here I wonder?" (U5.390)
Lotus-Eaters Pages: