"But a step in the required direction it was, beyond yea or nay and both monetarily and mentally it contained no reflection on his dignity in the smallest and it often turned in uncommonly handy to be handed a cheque at a muchneeded moment when every little helped." (U16.1843)
"In fact, he had the ball at his feet and that was the very reason why the other, possessed of a remarkably sharp nose for smelling a rat of any sort, hung on to him at all." (U16.1863)
"The horse, having reached the end of his tether, so to speak, halted, and, rearing high a proud feathering tail, added his quota by letting fall on the floor, which the brush would soon brush up and polish, three smoking globes of turds. Slowly, three times, one after another, from a full crupper, he mired. And humanely his driver waited till he (or she) had ended, patient in his scythed car." (U16.1874)
"but merely watched the two figures, as he sat on his lowbacked car, both black, one full, one lean, walk towards the railway bridge, to be married by Father Maher." (U16.1885)

'The Low-Backed Car' is a song written in 1846 by Samuel Lover (1797 - 1868). The tune is said to be a variant of the English folksong 'The Jolly Ploughboy.' This PC starts the last stanza, that continues:
"On a cushion made with taste,
While Peggy would sit beside me,
With my arm around her waist.
As we drove in the low-back'd car,
To be married by Father Maher,
Oh, my heart would beat high
At her glance and her sigh,
Tho' it beat in a low-back'd car."
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