"but she never made a bigger mistake in all her life because Gerty could see without looking that he never took his eyes off of her" (U13.494)
"and then Canon O'Hanlon handed the thurible back to Father Conroy" (U13.496)
"and knelt down looking up at the Blessed Sacrament and the choir began to sing Tantum ego" (U13.497)

'Tantum ergo' are the opening words of the last 2 verses of Pange Lingua, a Mediaeval Latin hymn written by St Thomas Aquinas. The two verses are sung during the Veneration and Benediction of the Blessed Sacrament in the Roman Catholic Church.

The Tantum ergo starts:
Tantum ergo Sacramentum (Down in adoration falling)
Veneremur cernui... (The sacred Host we venerate)...
From CE 1913: "Of the musical settings, which are very abundant, the appropriate word must be one of caution in view of the direction of Pius X in his Instruction on Sacred Music (22 Nov., 1903, IV): 'In the hymns of the Church the traditional form of the hymn is to be preserved. It is not lawful, therefore, to compose for instance, a Tantum ergo in such wise that the first trophe presents a romanza, a cavatina, an adagio, and the Genitori an allegro.'

Singenberger, in the 'Guide to Catholic Church Music' (St. Francis, Wisconsin, 1905), gives grade, voices, composer, etc., of more than six hundred setting of the "Tantum ergo" [including plainchant melodies, settings by C.P. Bach, A. Bruchner, G. Faure, M. Durufle, F. Schubert...].

Authorities differ as to the time for incensing. Martinucci directs the placing of incense in the thurible before 'Tantum ergo' and the incensing after 'veneremur cernui'. De Carpo suggests both either before 'Tantum ergo' or after 'veneremur cernui', according to the custom of the particular church."
"and she just swung her foot in and out in time as the music rose and fell to the Tantumer gosa cramen tum." (U13.498)
"Three and eleven she paid for those stockings in Sparrow's of George's street on the Tuesday,Three and eleven she paid for those stockings in Sparrow's of George's street on the Tuesday, no the Monday before Easter" (U13.499)
"Edy Boardman was noticing it too because she was squinting at Gerty, half smiling, with her specs like an old maid, pretending to nurse the baby. Irritable little gnat she was and always would be and that was why no-one could get on with her, poking her nose into what was no concern of hers. And she said to Gerty:
- A penny for your thoughts." (U13.521)
"And when Cissy came up Edy asked her the time and Miss Cissy, as glib as you like, said it was half past kissing time, time to kiss again. But Edy wanted to know because they were told to be in early.
- Wait, said Cissy, I'll ask my uncle Peter over there what's the time by his conundrum." (U13.531)
"Cissy said to excuse her would he mind please telling her what was the right time and Gerty could see him taking out his watch, listening to it and looking up and clearing his throat and he said he was very sorry his watch was stopped but he thought it must be after eight because the sun was set. His voice had a cultured ring in it and though he spoke in measured accents there was a suspicion of a quiver in the mellow tones. Cissy said thanks and came back with her tongue out and said uncle said his waterworks were out of order." (U13.544)
"Then they sang the second verse of the Tantum ergo and Canon O'Hanlon got up again" (U13.552)
"and censed the Blessed Sacrament and knelt down and he told Father Conroy that one of the candles was just going to set fire to the flowers and Father Conroy got up and settled it all right and she could see the gentleman winding his watch and listening to the works and she swung her leg more in and out in time." (U13.553)
"It was getting darker but he could see and he was looking all the time that he was winding the watch or whatever he was doing to it and then he put it back and put his hands back into his pockets. She felt a kind of a sensation rushing all over her and she knew by the feel of her scalp and that irritation against her stays that that thing must be coming on because the last time too was when she clipped her hair on account of the moon." (U13.557)
"His dark eyes fixed themselves on her again, drinking in her every contour, literally worshipping at her shrine. If ever there was undisguised admiration in a man's passionate gaze it was there plain to be seen on that man's face. It is for you, Gertrude MacDowell, and you know it." (U13.563)
"and Canon O'Hanlon stood up with his cope poking up at his neck and Father Conroy handed him the card to read off and he read out Panem de coelo praestitisti eis and Edy and Cissy were talking about the time all the time and asking her" (U13.572)
"but Gerty could pay them back in their own coin and she just answered with scathing politeness when Edy asked her was she heartbroken about her best boy throwing her over. Gerty winced sharply. A brief cold blaze shone from her eyes that spoke volumes of scorn immeasurable. It hurt - O yes, it cut deep because Edy had her own quiet way of saying things like that she knew would wound like the confounded little cat she was. Gerty's lips parted swiftly to frame the word but she fought back the sob that rose to her throat, so slim, so flawless, so beautifully moulded it seemed one an artist might have dreamed of." (U13.575)
"She had loved him better than he knew. Lighthearted deceiver and fickle like all his sex he would never understand what he had meant to her and for an instant there was in the blue eyes a quick stinging of tears." (U13.584)
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