"- Onehandled adulterer! the professor cried. I like that. I see the idea. I see what you mean." (U7.1019)

In 1794, Lord Horatio Nelson lost his right eye at the siege of Calvi.
Then in 1797, while commanding the ship Theseus during an unsuccessful expedition to conquer Santa Cruz de Tenerife, he was shot in the right arm with a musketball, shattering his humerus. Since amputation was the only available treatment for most serious limb wounds (to prevent death by gangrene), Nelson lost almost his entire right arm, and later referred to the stub as 'my fin.'
"DAMES DONATE DUBLIN'S CITS
SPEEDPILLS VELOCITOUS AEROLITHS, BELIEF
- It gives them a crick in their necks, Stephen said, and they are too tired to look up or down or to speak. They put the bag of plums between them" (U7.1021)
"and eat the plums out of it one after another, wiping off with their handkerchiefs the plumjuice that dribbles out of their mouths and spitting the plumstones slowly out between the railings.
He gave a sudden loud young laugh as a close. Lenehan and Mr O'Madden Burke, hearing, turned, beckoned and led on across towards Mooney's.
- Finished? Myles Crawford said. So long as they do no worse." (U7.1024)
"SOPHIST WALLOPS HAUGHTY HELEN
SQUARE ON PROBOSCIS. SPARTANS GNASH
MOLARS. ITHACANS VOW PEN IS CHAMP
- You remind me of Antisthenes, the professor said, a disciple of Gorgias, the sophist. It is said of him that none could tell if he were bitterer against others or against himself. He was the son of a noble and a bondwoman. And he wrote a book in which he took away the palm of beauty from Argive Helen and handed it to poor Penelope.
Poor Penelope. Penelope Rich." (U7.1032)

"They made ready to cross O'Connell street." (U7.1041)

Although the official name in 1904 was Sackville street, many Dubliners, likely Catholic and nationalist (including the narrator), already called it O'Connell street, the name it will officially take in 1924. This PC shows the view across the street from the GPO, which included the Imperial Hotel and Clery's Department Stores.
"HELLO THERE, CENTRAL!
At various points along the eight lines tramcars with motionless trolleys stood in their tracks, bound for or from Rathmines, Rathfarnham," (U7.1042)
"Blackrock," (U7.1045)
"Kingstown" (U7.1045)
"and Dalkey, Sandymount Green, Ringsend and Sandymount Tower," (U7.1045)
"Donnybrook, Palmerston Park and Upper Rathmines, all still, becalmed in short circuit. Hackney cars, cabs, delivery waggons, mailvans, private broughams, aerated mineral water floats with rattling crates of bottles, rattled, rolled, horsedrawn, rapidly." (U7.1046)
"WHAT? - AND LIKEWISE - WHERE?
- But what do you call it? Myles Crawford asked. Where did they get the plums?

VIRGILIAN, SAYS PEDAGOGUE. SOPHOMORE
PLUMPS FOR OLD MAN MOSES.
- Call it, wait, the professor said, opening his long lips wide to reflect. Call it, let me see. Call it: Deus nobis haec otia fecit.
- No, Stephen said, I call it A Pisgah Sight of Palestine or The Parable of the Plums.
—I see, the professor said." (U7.1050)
"He halted on sir John Gray's pavement island and peered aloft at Nelson through the meshes of his wry smile." (U7.1067)

This SV (1901) shows the pavement island of sir John Gray's statue, and the direction of the gaze of MacHugh.
Sir John Gray (1815 - 1875) was the proprietor of the Freeman's Journal, M.P. for Kilkenny city, and Chairman of the Dublin Corporation Water Works Committee from 1863 to 1875. In this latter role, he was instrumental in procuring, from Co. Wicklow, a clean water supply to Dublin and suburbs.

His statue on Sackville street stood between the monument to O'Connell and Nelson's pillar. The work of Irish artist Foley, it was unveiled in 1879.
"DIMINISHED DIGITS PROVE TOO TITILLATING FOR FRISKY FRUMPS. ANNE WIMBLES, FLO WANGLES - YET CAN YOU BLAME THEM?
- Onehandled adulterer, he said smiling grimly. That tickles me, I must say." (U7.1069)
"- Tickled the old ones too, Myles Crawford said, if the God Almighty's truth was known." (U7.1074)
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